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Caffeine Free Tea

Caffeine

Caffeine Free Tea

The world’s love for tea is second only to water. It is the most widely consumed drink in the steaming hot or ice-chilled form. Every day more than 159 million Americans drink tea—that is 4 out of 5 Yankees.

The majority of tea on the planet earth is cultivated in mountainous 3000 – 7000 ft above sea level areas—located between the Tropics of Capricorn and Cancer in acidic and mineral-loaded soil. About 15% of the countries grow tea with China, India, Argentina, Japan, Kenya, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, and Taiwan being the leading tea producers.

It’s a no-brainer that black tea is by far the most consumed variety, and is preferred by 84% of Americans. Yet, the popularity of zero-caffeine tea is globally growing due to its organic power to help fight obesity, weight reduction, and combat cold, cough, and stress.

Also, the caffeine-free tea niche is finding a significant liking by Generation X.

Moreover, caffeine-free fruit-flavored tea is rapidly becoming the go-to drink of adults aged 18 to 34. The tea industry observers are expecting the global no-caffeine tea market to rocket its revenues over $7.5 billion by 2020.

Why Drink Caffeine Free Tea

There is no harm in consuming an insignificant amount of caffeine every day.

However, some people avoid it altogether due to sensitivity or any health condition. It’s because caffeine is a stimulant, and excessive intake can cause your heart to beat irregularly, besides causing adrenal fatigue, jitters, and anxiety.

Therefore, whether you have made a no-caffeine commitment on your own, or upon the advice of your health practitioner—start by eliminating black as well as green tea, as both of them carry varying degrees of caffeine.

Remember, even “decaffeinated” black teas have traces of caffeine. Therefore, embrace the exciting, nourishing habit of caffeine-free tea to add more years to your body.

7 Types of Caffeine Free Tea

1. Ginger Tea

Ginger

Earthy with a pinch, ginger is native to Southern China, and is grown in sunny climates. Its stem, or root accord flavor to several kinds of cuisine, but ginger is also a centuries-old herbal cure for many ailments. This flowering plant is rich in Vitamin C, magnesium, fiber, Vitamin B3 and B6—all extremely healthy for your body.

Ginger tea is a fantastic option for the winters, as by virtue of being a diaphoretic tea, it warms your body from the inside, while simultaneously encouraging perspiration.

Ginger Tea Health Benefits

  • Ginger is tailor-made to treat morning sickness
  • Helps to lessen muscle aches and pains
  • Aids curing chronic indigestion
  • The powdered form can greatly reduce menstrual pain
  • Ginger might improve brain function and safeguard against Alzheimer’s disease
  • Ginger can lessen your cholesterol levels

Making Ginger Tea

Steep 20—40 grams of freshly sliced ginger in a cup of steaming water, and you’re good to go. To enhance your flavor, add a drop of honey or a slice of lemon.

BUDDHA TEAS—Ginger Root Tea

Crafted with only wild-harvested or organic ingredients—Ginger Root Tea is a caffeine-free spicy tea with a mild taste and an intense flavor. This BUDDHA TEAS product is packaged in bleach-free tea bags, which guarantees your health right from the steeping.

Ginger Root Tea contains antimicrobial properties and anti-inflammatory antioxidants, which warms your body, calms your stomach, and provides relief from muscle aches.

You should steep the tea for about 3 – 6 minutes in boiling water to really get the flavor juice out.

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2. Chamomile Tea

Chamomile Tea

Chamomile hails from the flowers of the Asteraceae family, and is a centuries-old natural remedy for many health ailments such as anxiety and stomach aches. Today, in the United States, chamomile is recognized as a primary or supportive ingredient in a caffeine-free drink.

To make chamomile tea, the flowers of either the Roman or German chamomile plant are completely dried and then infused into hot water.

The majority of Americans drink chamomile tea for earthy, slightly sweet taste. Yet, it is packed with powerful antioxidants that can lower your risk of contracting many health problems including cardiovascular and cancer.

Chamomile Tea Health Benefits

  • It improves your sleep quality over time
  • It may encourage digestive health
  • It might safeguard you against certain cancer types
  • Chamomile can help you to control your blood sugar
  • It may make your heart healthier

Making Chamomile Tea

According to the University of Maryland, you should mix three tbsp. of dried chamomile to a cup of hot water before letting it rest for about 15 minutes.

If your health practitioner approves, up to four cups of chamomile tea a day can cure your anxiety while improving your digestion.

TEAS’ TEA ORGANIC chamomile herbal tea

The ORGANIC chamomile herbal tea with lemongrass and peppermint by TEA’S TEA is sugarless and caffeine-free. Brewed with high-quality herbal tea leaves, a single serving of this tea contains zero calories and loads of calm-inducing effects on your body.

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3. Peppermint Tea

Peppermint TeaThe aromatic peppermint herb is a cross of spearmint and watermint from the mint family. It is native to Asia and Europe and is a time-honored natural remedy for many health problems. Also, it has an exquisitely minty taste.

Peppermint leaves carry numerous essential oils including menthone, menthol, and limonene. Menthol accords peppermint its distinctly minty aroma and cooling properties. Peppermint flavors your breath mints, gums, and other edibles.

Also, many individuals drink peppermint as a soothing, caffeine-free tea. Consumed for its taste, the peppermint tea also offers many health benefits.

Peppermint Tea Health Benefits

  • It can calm an upset stomach
  • Peppermint freshens up your breath
  • It can relieve clogged sinuses
  • It soothes menstrual cramps
  • It can fight bacterial infections
  • Peppermint improves your sleep
  • It can aid you to lose weight

Making Peppermint Tea

Add peppermint leaves to a cup (250ml) of steaming water, and let it steep for 7 to 12 minutes. After that use a tea strainer to put out the leaves. You can add a dash of honey to further enrich your flavor.

365 EVERYDAY VALUE—ORGANIC Peppermint HERBAL TEA

Amazon’s Choice for “peppermint tea”

The ORGANIC Peppermint HERBAL TEA is made with the finest quality of peppermint cultivated across the world. The richness of menthol in this tea makes it a fantastic option for people who crave a relaxing, zero caffeine tea.

To extract maximum flavor, add a tea bag into a cup (250ml) of hot water, and let it steep for about 3 – 5 minutes. Alternatively, to make iced tea, add four Peppermint HERBAL TEA bags to a liter of steaming water, and let it rest for about 5 – 8 minutes. Add sweetener, if you desire, and serve over ice.

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4. Rooibos Tea

 Rooibos Tea
Rooibos tea—also called red bush or red tea—is rapidly growing in popularity as a deliciously healthy tea option. It is typically consumed like black tea, with the added option of sugar and milk. Still, the iced, espresso and latte versions of rooibos tea have also established their respective niches.

The tea is made with the leaves of Aspalathus linearis shrub. It is a flavorful, caffeine-free substitute for caffeinated tea products.

Rooibos is native to Southern Africa and is grown only in a specific region of the country. Traditionally, rooibos is made through leaves fermentation, which makes them reddish-brown. Conversely, the green unfermented rooibos is grassier in flavor than the conventional one and is also pricier. Additionally, it carries more antioxidants.

Rooibos Tea Health Benefits

  • It is free from oxalic acid and low in tannins
  • It’s loaded with antioxidants
  • Rooibos can improve your heart health
  • It can reduce the risk of certain cancer types
  • Rooibos might assist individuals with Type 2 diabetes

Making Rooibos Tea

Add a tea bag or a heaped tsp. of loose rooibos leaves to a cup (250ml) of steaming water, and let it rest for about three minutes. Also, over brewing is not a problem, as the tea does not contain any caffeine.

Also, when you’re brewing in a cup—always remember to add milk after steeping, and vice versa when making rooibos in a teapot. You can add sugar, honey, or slices of
lemon for a richer healthier rooibos tea experience.

NUMI ORGANIC TEA—ROOIBOS CHAI

Amazon’s Choice for “Numi tea”

NUMI ORGANIC TEA melded zesty cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg with ginger, sweet allspice, and a sprinkle of cardamom to make this all-natural caffeine-free ROOIBOS CHAI.

The maker recommends adding a bag of Rooibos tea to a cup (250ml) of boiling water and letting it steep for 5 to 6 minutes. You can add milk for an enhanced taste profile. Alternatively, pour two chai bags in the same amount of water with ice for iced tea.

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5. Lemongrass Tea

Lemongrass Tea
A quiet evening, a terrific book, some freshly baked cookies, and piping hot lemongrass tea—isn’t life beautiful?

Lemongrass is a lanky, stalky plant—much like seagrasses—with a citrus flavor and lemony fragrance. There are about 55 species of lemongrass, yet only the East and West Indian varieties can be edible consumed.

Typically, fresh or dried lemongrass is used to make the tea. The exquisite blend of pungent lemony and sweetly floral flavor goes well with savory as well as sweet foods. The most popular way to consume lemongrass is in tisanes, as dried or fresh lemongrass can be boiled or steeped to make a decoction or herbal infusion.

This herb is also a time-honored remedy to relieve pain, promote sleep, and boost immunity.

Lemongrass Tea Health Benefits

  • It carries antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties
  • It can reduce your risk for certain cancer types
  • It promotes healthy digestion
  • It may lesson high systolic blood pressure
  • It aids in regulating your cholesterol
  • It can assist you to lose weight

Making Lemongrass Tea

Boil the water over high heat for a minute before adding lemongrass. Now boil it again for five rapid minutes. Now turn off your stove, and let it simmer for five more minutes. After straining the stalks from the liquid, drink it hot, or with ice.

More: The Best Detox Teas Out There

6. Rosemary Tea

Rosemary Tea

The Rosemary plant is a shrub native to the Mediterranean region. It is a descendant of the mint family, and the leaves are utilized to make rosemary extract, essential oil, and tea.

Rosemary tea is organically caffeine-free and is loaded with vitamins, calcium, and iron. It offers powerful notes of pine with delicate undertones of mint and lemon.

Rosemary Tea Health Benefits

  • Rosemary tea is rich in antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory compounds
  • It can help you to lower your blood sugar
  • It may improve your memory and mood
  • It encourages brain health
  • Rosemary tea improves your eye health and vision over time

Making Rosemary Tea

Rosemary tea can be made from fresh as well as dried leaves, pure or blended alongside other ingredients.

Add a heaping tsp. of rosemary loose leaves or a tea bag in a cup (250ml) of hot water. Let the mixture tea brew for 5 to 10 minutes. Despite having a powerful aroma, rosemary offers a delicate flavor.

BUDDHA TEAS—Rosemary Tea

This caffeine-free Rosemary Tea by BUDDHA TEAS is made only with fresh or wildly harvested ingredients to deliver a genuinely stimulating, delicious cup of tea, hot or iced.

To make Rosemary Tea, the manufacturer recommends using filtered or spring water, and steeping time of 3 to 6 minutes.

7. Fruit Tea

Fruit Tea

Fruit teas either contain real fruit juice or the infusion of exotic fruits with earthy teas, spices, and herbs. Also, some fruit tea types have real tea leaves in them.

This tea type can be enjoyed at any time of the day due to them being caffeine-free and enriched with the vitality of fresh fruits. They are a marvelous substitute to caffeinated teas, and you have an array of fruit infusions to choose from.

Fruit Tea Health Benefits

If you relish a steaming cup of apple or raspberry-infused tea, you are drinking your way to a healthier life. Apart from the organic power of the fresh fruits, these concoctions contain a host of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Moreover, true fruit teas do not carry any caffeine, which in turn improves your bone’s health. It is because, as per a “European Journal of Nutrition” study, a strongly brewed cup of tea with around 45 mg of caffeine can leach out 2 to 3 mg of calcium from your body.

Lastly, blends can also be made to enhance a certain type of dose, such as vitamins, or fiber for instance.

Making Fruit Tea

Pure fruit teas are concoctions of many fresh fruit flavors such as apple, raspberry, cherry, blackcurrant, orange, blueberry, peach, and strawberry. Therefore, they are not teas per se and are identified as tisanes.

In fact, you can make your own fruity drink by either brewing fresh fruit in steaming water or by utilizing concentrated fruit juice. You can also add herbs, leaves, petals, and blossoms to further enrich your flavor profile.

Remember, it is the boiling hot water that injects the flavor out of the fruit. Therefore, even to make an iced fruit tea, you must use steaming water first up.

Lastly, despite being water, a fruit tea does contain fruit sugars, and according to the Harvard School of Public Health, you should consume fruit juices loaded with natural sugar in moderation.

CELESTIAL SEASONINGS HERBAL TEA—Caffeine Free

Amazon’s Choice for “celestial seasonings tea”

The pack includes five distinctively flavored caffeine and gluten-free herbal teas. All the tea types are made with premium leaves plucked from the finest gardens of the world. Also, there are no artificial preservatives or flavors added to the tea mixture.

Add a Celestial tea bag into a cup (250ml) of hot water and let it rest for about 4 to 6 minutes to extract maximum taste.

How To Buy Caffeine-Free Tea?

Firstly, check out the packaging for the ‘caffeine-free’ label, or intently inspect the list of ingredients.

Always remember that decaffeinated tea does contain traces of caffeine, which can interfere with any prescribed medicine that you’re taking. In fact, the decaf tea making process removes flavonoids and polyphenols from the tea—which changes the flavor besides limiting health benefits of the tea.

Avoid tea blends with yerba mate, guarana, and guayusa, as they carry heavy loads of caffeine. Moreover, herbal cocoa tea also got caffeine in it, and is not recommended if you’re on a caffeine-free diet.

You May Also Like: Which Tea Has The Most Caffeine?

Conclusion

Tea is the world’s most widely consumed drink in the steaming hot or ice-chilled form. It’s a no-brainer that black tea is by far the most consumed variety, and is preferred by 84% of Americans.

Yet, the popularity of zero-caffeine tea is globally growing due to its organic power to help fight obesity, weight reduction, and combat cold, cough, and stress. The most popular caffeine-free tea types are:

Ginger Tea—a fantastic option for the winters, as by virtue of being a diaphoretic tea, it warms your body from the inside, while simultaneously encouraging perspiration.

Chamomile Tea—packed with powerful antioxidants that can lower your risk of contracting many health problems including cardiovascular and cancer.

Peppermint Tea—a soothing, caffeine-free tea that is consumed for its taste, while offering many health benefits.

Rooibos Tea—made with the leaves of Aspalathus linearis shrub. It is a flavorful, caffeine-free substitute to caffeinated tea products.

Lemongrass Tea—an exquisite blend of pungent lemony and sweetly floral flavor which goes well with savory as well as sweet foods.

Rosemary Tea—an organically caffeine-free tea that is loaded with vitamins, calcium, and iron. It offers powerful notes of pine with delicate undertones of mint and lemon.

Fruit Tea—hot beverages that carry real fruit juice or the infusion of exotic fruits with earthy herbs, teas, and spices.

Lastly, when buying Caffeine-Free Tea check out the packaging for the ‘caffeine-free’ label, or intently inspect the list of ingredients.

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